International Crypto Standards: Will They Come From the Community or Governments?
(Source: cointelegraph.com)

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(Original link: cointelegraph.com)

International Crypto Standards: Will They Come From the Community or Governments? International standards for crypto are coming, but at what cost to innovation? International standards for crypto are on their way, but they may not stop government regulation 9 Total views 0 Total shares Analysis
There are over 2,000 different coins in existence right now, each with their own unique characteristics, uses and communities, while there are masses of different blockchains , platforms and exchanges — all of which answer to competing needs and values. On the one hand, this profusion is one of the key driving forces behind innovation in the crypto sphere. But on the other, it arguably acts as a block against widespread adoption, as the lack of unified standards means that some morally questionable endeavors give the rest a bad name.
The past year has seen an intensifying push toward producing international standards for the cryptocurrency industry. Groups such as Global Digital Finance have risen with the aim of fostering universal standards on how crypto platforms are run, just as groups like the Blockchain Association and CryptoUK are now focused mostly on standards at a national level. Such organizations count the likes of Coinbase , Bitstamp , Circle and others as members, despite often being less than a year old.
However, while holding the promise that crypto will avoid stringent government regulation by learning how to regulate itself, there's also a concern that global standards might hamper innovation, and that crypto — almost by nature — is not meant to be standardized. Global Digital Finance
As Teana Baker-Taylor, the executive director of Global Digital Finance (GDF), told Cointelegraph, the London-based association aims “to demonstrate that self-governance and driving best practice is critical for the industry's consumers and their confidence in crypto assets, as the sector continues to mature, and in concert with developments in regulation."
In other words, GDF is seeking to develop voluntary guidelines and codes of conduct for exchanges, token sales, wallet providers, cryptocurrencies and ratings websites, and while it was launched only in March, it already has a strong roster of members.
At the end of October, payments company Circle (and owner of Poloniex ) joined it as a founder member,adding itself to a list that includes Coinbase , R3 , ConsenSys and Diginex. Meanwhile, Baker-Taylor affirms that the association has also begun having dialog with lawmakers and public institutions.
“With over 250 individuals and firms, global regulators and policy makers have paid attention to the GDF Code and the commitment of the community, and this is an important start. Understandably, the signal from many regulators has been mixed, but most we are engaging with are supportive of maintaining an open dialogue to ensure they do not stifle this important innovation.”
Yet, GDF isn’t only working on codes of conduct for token sales and crypto-exchanges. They're also busy devising a taxonomy of cryptocurrencies, which seeks to divide coins into three broad types: payment tokens, financial asset tokens and consumer tokens.
Given that there is plenty of confusion and conflict among the world's governments on how to define crypto, this attempt to produce a clear taxonomy of cryptocurrencies is much needed. However, seeing as how such organizations remain largely averse to classifying cryptocurrencies as money and/or assets, there will remain the worry that GDF's taxonomy (and codes) may simply be disregarded by governments and regulators. Governments
Despite possible opposition or resistance from governments, the groups like the GDF could have emerged precisely because of increasing government interest in crypto regulation . Anyway, their emergence at such a time presents the crypto world with a golden opportunity to get involved in the shaping of government policy.
In October, the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) — an intergovernmental group established by the G7 to combat money laundering — adopted a variety of changes to its standards concerning the regulation of virtual assets. And encouragingly for the crypto industry, these new recommendations were focused specifically on preventing money laundering and the financing of terrorism, leaving plenty of freedom for exchanges, token issuers and crypto-services to operate in accordance with the needs of their users and own logic. It said in its recommendations from October:
"The FATF Recommendations require monitoring or supervision only for the purposes of AML/CFT [Anti-Money Laundering/Countering Financing of Terrorism], and do not imply that virtual asset service providers are (or should be) subject to stability or consumer/investor protection safeguards, nor do they imply any consumer or investor protection safeguards."
Put simply, the FATF sees no reason to do anything about the volatility or decentralization of cryptocurrency, which implies that it wants to leave t...

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