Transcript: Sen. James Lankford talks with Michael Morell on "Intelligence Matters"
(Source: cbsnews.com)

clicks | 2 months ago | comments: discuss | tags: cryptocurrency


Article preview (bot search)

(Original link: cbsnews.com)

INTELLIGENCE MATTERS - INTERVIEW WITH SENATOR JAMES LANKFORD
CORRESPONDENT: MICHAEL MORELL
PRODUCER: OLIVIA GAZIS
MICHAEL MORELL:
Senator Lankford, thanks for joining us today. It's great to have you on the show.
SENATOR JAMES LANKFORD:
Michael, it's great to be able to have this conversation. Thanks.
MICHAEL MORELL:
We have at least a couple things in common. One-- and most important is that your mom was an elementary school librarian.
SENATOR JAMES LANKFORD:
That is correct--
MICHAEL MORELL:
And my wife is an elementary school librarian. It's an amazingly (LAUGH) important job, as you know, getting kids excited about reading.
SENATOR JAMES LANKFORD:
It is.
MICHAEL MORELL:
The other thing we have in common is we both have a podcast. What's your podcast called, and what do you try to do with it?
SENATOR JAMES LANKFORD:
I just called my podcast, "The Breakdown with James Lankford." And it-- we try to take some of the hard issues of the day and spend a little more time being able to invest in those issues and to say, "Okay, let-- l-- let's talk about something that everyone's talking about in the news in little 30 second pieces, and let's take 20 minutes-- to be able to really go into depth." Because as most people see, I think, on the news-- they see a story, they hear a story, and they think, "There's probably more to that than what it sounds," And there usually is.
MICHAEL MORELL:
Yeah. And where can they find that podcast?
SENATOR JAMES LANKFORD:
They can just go to Lankford.Senate.gov. That's-- my website, and they can get a chance to be able to find out more information there, and be able to listen. And we do about one a month and just take one of the hard issues of the month. Obviously, this month is gonna be Supreme Court-- because there's a lot about just the selection process, what's happened, and what goes on, be able to break down some of the issues.
MICHAEL MORELL:
Senator, you have a-- fascinating biography. In particular, the more than a decade you spent working with young people in Oklahoma, and I'd love to ask you a couple questions about that. I-- I'm sure the kids learned a great deal from you. What did you learn from them?
SENATOR JAMES LANKFORD:
There's a lot you can w-- learn from students, obviously. I worked for about two decades-- before I came to congress with students. That time period, you-- you have the opportunity to be able to learn from families-- listen to students. Students, if you've ever had time to really work with students-- they will ask you anything. They're uninhibited. What they think, they're just going to ask you.
And their main focus is, "Is that real? Is that really the facts? I-- I wanna know more about that." Because they're at that stage of learning and asking questions constantly, and pushing. That's a good thing. So it pushes you to try to just be authentic, not try to put on airs, and to say, "Okay, let-- let's just talk about this-- this is what I understand. This is what I don't understand." And I think if there's anything that students can teach you, it's a little bit of humility.
MICHAEL MORELL:
And they're not burdened by assumptions, right, that build up over life?
SENATOR JAMES LANKFORD:
No.
MICHAEL MORELL:
And so they ask you very simple but powerful questions.
SENATOR JAMES LANKFORD:
The-- the older we get, the more that we put things into boxes and say, "I've been around someone like you before, so you must be like them," and you immediately put someone in-- in that box, as you described, and say, "You're one of them because I-- I-- you remind me of something from before." With students, they're still building those boxes. And-- so you have the opportunity to be able to say, "Let's have a more open dialogue."
MICHAEL MORELL:
The other thing I'm wondering about is-- I'm-- I'm sure you still spend time with-- with young people in Oklahoma, and I'm wondering how you talk to them about the ugliness that has become part of our politics. 'Cause certainly, they see that, and how do you try to put that in context for them?
SENATOR JAMES LANKFORD:
I d-- I do spend a lot of time talking to-- student groups still. When I'm in a community in Oklahoma, I will often meet with several different business groups. I'll meet with the local media. I'll meet with just people on the street and be able to talk about-- I'll sit at a restaurant, and be able to just visit with random people and be able to connect.
And I'll often go to the high school or to a local college and-- just be able to visit with the students and be able to get a feel for that. Most of those folks know me, and from my background, my-- my time working with students was a faith-based work. I'm not ashamed of that. That's a part of who I am, and I think it's for any person-- they can make a decision about their own faith journey.
And-- so they'll ask me questions. "Okay, how do you connect your faith journey with what's happening in DC right now?" That-- that's a very fair question ba...

Resources